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Daniel Baron: Weekend of Mass Destruction

Special New Album By Daniel Baron

by Louw Mulder

‘Special’ – Google defines the word special as “Better, greater, or otherwise different from what is usual”.

With a blossoming South African music Industry, it will really take something extraordinary to be better, greater, and different than the ones before.

On the 13th of June, Daniel Baron launched his new album, “Weekend of Mass Destruction” at one of the penthouses at the Da Vinci Hotel in Sandton. Everything about this event was special; from the design of the invitation, to the venue, to the launch, and most importantly, his album.

The launch event was classy and intimate, and provided for the correct interlude for the music that was to come. With about 150 guests, this is what Daniel Baron wanted for the launch of his third solo album. Family, friends, and names in the music industry were cocktailed and dined, but mostly entertained in true serenade fashion, during an event that was per definition, very special.

It was when the Pyrotechniques of the saxophonist stopped, when the human mannequins came to life, the first sounds of Baron’s intimate and carefully selected repertoire began. With the backdrop of the sun setting over the traffic in Sandton, Baron introduced himself and launched his new album.

The live performance of some of the tracks on his new CD, created the best appetite for what is on this album. Daniel Baron created sounds on this project, which would be hard to categorise under one genre. It’s electronic, sometimes with a rock element, other times with House and dance infusions, which reiterates how special this album is.

Baron admitted that he did not want to be bound by one style on this CD. “I truly believe that these are the craziest yet possibly the best songs I have created yet. I have always believed in breaking musical boundaries, fusing genres and even generating new sounds” he said: “Most importantly I believe that music is here to inspire and bring joy to humanity. Music is a gift from God, and I think I have accomplished a bit of the above.”

His love of music, and musical instruments are evident in the album, and in the titles of some of his tracks. With this I refer to Pink Atomic Symphony, the intro track, Piano off the Roof, Beautiful Noise, and Blood and Violins.  All these tracks were composed and written by Baron himself, with a collaboration with Sketchy Bongo and Aewon Wolf, on the track Private Show. He was assisted by the very talented Tjaart van der Walt, who has done some additional compositions on this album.

As explained by Daniel Baron himself, the theme of this album is the destruction of any negativity and hate. With this album, his goal is to prove that music can create peace and love, and bring enemies together in one dance. It is clear that a lot of special time went into this album, to set this theme to the music he produced. “I have never been so proud of anything in my life as I am of this album” Baron Said: “I have never worked this hard. I’ve put everything behind this project and I have all faith in it.”

Personally, my favourite track of this album, is Children of the Sun, because I can once again mention that it is something special. Daniel Baron explained during the launch how this tune came to him one day in traffic, and how this song opened up so many possibilities. The addition to children’s voices, builds up to a catchy tune and a nice dance feel to it that gets stuck in your head for hours after. With compliments of Daniel’s YouTube channel, you can listen to this track at the bottom of this article.

Weekend of Mass Destruction is not for the faint hearted. It is a Special product, of a Special artist, with a very Special sound. With this album, Daniel Baron moves the boundaries, and through 13 special tracks, opens up so many possibilities of how South African Music can be a trendsetter internationally.

Weekend of Mass Destruction is now available on Itunes and Apple Music.

The review was edited by Bronwyn Kerry.

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